Jon Reiner

The Man Who Couldn't Eat

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Hour 1: How would you cope with the medical inability to eat? It’s a question our guest this hour, food writer Jon Reiner, had to answer as a result of his debilitating battle with Crohn’s disease. We’ll talk with him about the experience and his new memoir “The Man Who Couldn’t Eat” (Gallery Books, 2011).

  • Glen Hawkins

    I listened to this program today and found myself in tears.  Your guest was discussing and describing the last 12 years of my life.  I was not diagnosed with Crohn’s disease, but it all began after an ulcer surgery and removing half my stomach and part of my small intestine.  7 surgery’s later… I weigh 90lbs and spent May of 2011 in the hospital with yet another undiagnosed episode that no one can explain.  They ran every test imaginable and still have no answers.  It was just nice hearing from someone who has actually lived through all the “unknown’s” and how closely related his story is to mine.  Thanks!!  Glen Hawkins

    • http://mobilevisibility.com Richard Posey

      Hey, Glen … I’ve been thinking about you. Send me an email if you’d like. (clicking on my profile will take you to several ways to get ahold of me. – RP

  • Glen Hawkins

    I listened to this program today and found myself in tears.  Your guest was discussing and describing the last 12 years of my life.  I was not diagnosed with Crohn’s disease, but it all began after an ulcer surgery and removing half my stomach and part of my small intestine.  7 surgery’s later… I weigh 90lbs and spent May of 2011 in the hospital with yet another undiagnosed episode that no one can explain.  They ran every test imaginable and still have no answers.  It was just nice hearing from someone who has actually lived through all the “unknown’s” and how closely related his story is to mine.  Thanks!!  Glen Hawkins

    • http://retireesforhire.org/ Richard Posey

      Hey, Glen … I’ve been thinking about you. Send me an email if you’d like. (clicking on my profile will take you to several ways to get ahold of me. – RP

  • http://mobilevisibility.com Richard Posey

    I find it interesting how we are all “an experiment of one.” There were many similarities between my experience with Crohn’s and Jon’s. Yet there were some significant differences … he craved foods, I rarely did. I found that the discomfort of hunger was the lesser evil versus what sometimes happened to me when I ate. I became “food-averse,” if you will. Eating became a form of “Russian roulette,” even though it was absolutely necessary to eat something. Right now, I’m going through one of those happy times Jon described. I’m slender, yet probably more fit, athletic and healthier overall than most people my age. I’ve lucked out. The “silver bullet” for me seems to have been my gastroenterologist’s recommendation that I try the Align probiotic (which I later switched to Activia yogurt and later to kefir cultured milk). I’ve had the remarkable transformation of going from being lactose intolerant to being able to enjoy ice cream and cheese, again. I know there are still structural problems in my gut (strictures from old scarring of the intestine) that require some caution on my part, but I have the feeling of someone released from prison: happily free, but always on probation. I hope that other Crohn’s sufferers are so fortunate. Thanks for doing this piece and sharing it with KERA’s audience. – Richard Posey

  • http://mobilevisibility.com Richard Posey

    I find it interesting how we are all “an experiment of one.” There were many similarities between my experience with Crohn’s and Jon’s. Yet there were some significant differences … he craved foods, I rarely did. I found that the discomfort of hunger was the lesser evil versus what sometimes happened to me when I ate. I became “food-averse,” if you will. Eating became a form of “Russian roulette,” even though it was absolutely necessary to eat something. Right now, I’m going through one of those happy times Jon described. I’m slender, yet probably more fit, athletic and healthier overall than most people my age. I’ve lucked out. The “silver bullet” for me seems to have been my gastroenterologist’s recommendation that I try the Align probiotic (which I later switched to Activia yogurt and later to kefir cultured milk). I’ve had the remarkable transformation of going from being lactose intolerant to being able to enjoy ice cream and cheese, again. I know there are still structural problems in my gut (strictures from old scarring of the intestine) that require some caution on my part, but I have the feeling of someone released from prison: happily free, but always on probation. I hope that other Crohn’s sufferers are so fortunate. Thanks for doing this piece and sharing it with KERA’s audience. – Richard Posey

  • http://mobilevisibility.com Richard Posey

    I find it interesting how we are all “an experiment of one.” There were many similarities between my experience with Crohn’s and Jon’s. Yet there were some significant differences … he craved foods, I rarely did. I found that the discomfort of hunger was the lesser evil versus what sometimes happened to me when I ate. I became “food-averse,” if you will. Eating became a form of “Russian roulette,” even though it was absolutely necessary to eat something. Right now, I’m going through one of those happy times Jon described. I’m slender, yet probably more fit, athletic and healthier overall than most people my age. I’ve lucked out. The “silver bullet” for me seems to have been my gastroenterologist’s recommendation that I try the Align probiotic (which I later switched to Activia yogurt and later to kefir cultured milk). I’ve had the remarkable transformation of going from being lactose intolerant to being able to enjoy ice cream and cheese, again. I hope that other Crohn’s sufferers are so fortunate. Thanks for doing this piece and sharing it with KERA’s audience. – Richard Posey  (this is a re-post because editing a comment on Disqus makes your comment disappear)

  • http://retireesforhire.org/ Richard Posey

    I find it interesting how we are all “an experiment of one.” There were many similarities between my experience with Crohn’s and Jon’s. Yet there were some significant differences … he craved foods, I rarely did. I found that the discomfort of hunger was the lesser evil versus what sometimes happened to me when I ate. I became “food-averse,” if you will. Eating became a form of “Russian roulette,” even though it was absolutely necessary to eat something. Right now, I’m going through one of those happy times Jon described. I’m slender, yet probably more fit, athletic and healthier overall than most people my age. I’ve lucked out. The “silver bullet” for me seems to have been my gastroenterologist’s recommendation that I try the Align probiotic (which I later switched to Activia yogurt and later to kefir cultured milk). I’ve had the remarkable transformation of going from being lactose intolerant to being able to enjoy ice cream and cheese, again. I hope that other Crohn’s sufferers are so fortunate. Thanks for doing this piece and sharing it with KERA’s audience. – Richard Posey  (this is a re-post because editing a comment on Disqus makes your comment disappear)

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