Cherokee Stop

Saving Native American Languages

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Hour 1: From the archives – What is lost when a language “dies”? We spent an hour in July with Colleen Fitzgerald, associate professor and chairperson of UT Arlington’s Department of Linguistics and TESOL and Mary Linn, an anthropologist at the University of Oklahoma and curator of Native American language at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History.

  • Gekkeindiaan

    I agree with you
    your doing great
    let every language live

    gerard

  • Gekkeindiaan

    I agree with you
    your doing great
    let every language live

    gerard

  • Anonymous

    We have to go further than just having “Stop” signs in Cherokee in Oklahoma.  Throughout the country, there needs to be language immersion programs on reservation schools.  Programs that encourage original compositions.  It is nice to keep alive old legends in Native languages, but using the language in the present context is essential if it it going to be keep vibrant.  What makes a language endangered or extinct, is that it loses its currency in the marketplace.  So hopefully throughout Oklahoma, languages can be used in stores and banks. and to take this nationwide.  We can correct the mistakes of the boarding schools.

  • TimUpham

    We have to go further than just having “Stop” signs in Cherokee in Oklahoma.  Throughout the country, there needs to be language immersion programs on reservation schools.  Programs that encourage original compositions.  It is nice to keep alive old legends in Native languages, but using the language in the present context is essential if it it going to be keep vibrant.  What makes a language endangered or extinct, is that it loses its currency in the marketplace.  So hopefully throughout Oklahoma, languages can be used in stores and banks. and to take this nationwide.  We can correct the mistakes of the boarding schools.

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