Paper Promises

Debt, Money, and the New World Order

Think 4 Comments 1

Hour 1:           How will the ongoing European financial crisis and overall political uncertainty affect the potential for economic recovery here in the United States? We’ll talk this hour with Philip Coggan, Buttonwood columnist of The Economist and author of “Paper Promises: Debt, Money, and the New World Order” (PublicAffairs, 2012). He’ll address the World Affairs Council of Dallas Fort Worth this Friday.

  • Anonymous

    I listened to this interview while I was driving yesterday and I was fascinated. The Phillip Coggin interview was a concise overview of the effect of debt on a global scale and why all the solutions are fraught with risk. It does seem like the ones that will be hurt the most, in every scenario, will be the prudent savers.  

  • Anonymous

    I listened to this interview while I was driving yesterday and I was fascinated. The Phillip Coggin interview was a concise overview of the effect of debt on a global scale and why all the solutions are fraught with risk. It does seem like the ones that will be hurt the most, in every scenario, will be the prudent savers.  

  • BigJim59

    I listened to this interview while I was driving yesterday and I was fascinated. The Phillip Coggin interview was a concise overview of the effect of debt on a global scale and why all the solutions are fraught with risk. It does seem like the ones that will be hurt the most, in every scenario, will be the prudent savers.  

  • Stevemon

    Two things I took away from this interview.  One: growth is least painful option out of the current economic predicatment, and Two: Growth for the past 200 years of the industrial revolution has relied on access to relatively inexpensive fossil energy resources.   Yes, under current policies, savers suffer while borrowers are encouraged at least until the majority realize continual borrowing on the premise of continual growth meets the limits of abundant cheap energy.

Back to Top