Rafe Sagarin

Learning From the Octopus

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Hour 2:           What can humans learn about resilience and adaptability by simply observing the natural world? We’ll talk this hour with Rafe Sagarin, marine ecologist and environmental policy analyst at the University of Arizona. His new book is “Learning From the Octopus: How Secrets from Nature Can Help Us Fight Terrorist Attacks, Natural Disasters, and Disease” (Basic Books, 2012).

  • http://www.facebook.com/flatworlddesign Raj Menon

    Very interesting subject – and well done interview, as usual!  Kudos, Kris Boyd,

  • http://www.facebook.com/flatworlddesign Raj Menon

    Very interesting subject – and well done interview, as usual!  Kudos, Kris Boyd,

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Kay-Merkel-Boruff/1357563646 Kay Merkel Boruff

    Rafe, great interview. & thanks for mentioning the returning veterans’ great skill base to future employers.

  • http://www.wix.com/kmerkelboruff/writeinkorg2011 Kay Merkel Boruff

    Rafe, great interview. & thanks for mentioning the returning veterans’ great skill base to future employers.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/NUKPIRMJKPEJOYROZTAD3FE7YU grainger

    Mr. Sagarin was interesting until someone called and asked about how his theories might apply to government.  He immediately stated “for the record” that he was not a “tea party Repbulican.”  Not sure what that had to do with anything other than setting up his bona fides with a particular demographic.
    He then went on to babble about how government was the skin of the octopus and that its authority was needed and it was more “responsible” because of it’s elected nature.  Also, that businesses were as responsive as they might win a major contract. The latter comment demonstrated an extreme ignorance of business and markets.  Further his position on government was very inconsistent with his anecdotal bit about asking his students what they want to learn about the topic he was going to teach.  
    Mr. Sagarin was good as long as he stuck to anecdotal and observational descriptions.  Once he tried to broaden his theory, he bent the theory to allow for his own idealogical biases.  

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