The Book of Rules

The Right Way to Do Everything?

Think 12 Comments 12

Hour 2:           Could our public and private interactions with one another be improved if we just followed the rules? And which rules would we follow? We’ll spend this hour with writer Joshua Belter who sets out to solve our social and organizational shortcomings in his book “The Book of Rules: The Right Way to Do Everything” (How, 2012).

  • Walty

    I disagree with the person who thinks that a person with dogs should get off the sidewalk for her. I think that a person with two dogs has just as much right to stay on the sidewalk. It would be easier for her to go around.

  • Dan in North Dallas

    What is the protocol for two cars heading toward each other on a narrow residential alleyway?  Usually one car pulls off the alley into a driveway to allow the other car to pass, but is there a rule as to who must yield?  

  • Walty

    I disagree with the person who thinks that a person with dogs should get off the sidewalk for her. I think that a person with two dogs has just as much right to stay on the sidewalk. It would be easier for her to go around.

  • Dan in North Dallas

    What is the protocol for two cars heading toward each other on a narrow residential alleyway?  Usually one car pulls off the alley into a driveway to allow the other car to pass, but is there a rule as to who must yield?  

  • Melody

    Re: toilet seat rules
    I tell guests I don’t want my dogs drinking from the toilet, so please put the lid down when they’re done. This seems fair to both men and women.

    • Jessica

      I completely agree! It looks nicer too.

  • Melody

    Re: toilet seat rules
    I tell guests I don’t want my dogs drinking from the toilet, so please put the lid down when they’re done. This seems fair to both men and women.

    • Jessica

      I completely agree! It looks nicer too.

  • Guesty McGuest

    I was driving while listening to the show and couldn’t call in to comment, but the dogs-walking/jogger issue concerned me. Toward the end of the program, the author argued that the faster-moving person (jogger) should be given deference, but that flies in the face of traditional deference to pedestrians over skaters, bicyclists, and cars operating in the same space – e.g. at White Rock Lake. Why should a slower dog-walker (or person walking a toddler) and who has been on the sidewalk longer have to accommodate a jogger that suddenly turned the corner and arrived? It’s not a game of Frogger.

  • Guesty McGuest

    I was driving while listening to the show and couldn’t call in to comment, but the dogs-walking/jogger issue concerned me. Toward the end of the program, the author argued that the faster-moving person (jogger) should be given deference, but that flies in the face of traditional deference to pedestrians over skaters, bicyclists, and cars operating in the same space – e.g. at White Rock Lake. Why should a slower dog-walker (or person walking a toddler) and who has been on the sidewalk longer have to accommodate a jogger that suddenly turned the corner and arrived? It’s not a game of Frogger.

  • Elizstri

    I must disagree with the comment near the end about whether or not houseguests should strip the beds after their last night.  The author said he’d lean toward strip the bed.  I think the guests should re-make the bed for 2 reasons: first, one cannot assume the hosts will have time to immediately do the laundry, second, it makes the room look neater.

  • Elizstri

    I must disagree with the comment near the end about whether or not houseguests should strip the beds after their last night.  The author said he’d lean toward strip the bed.  I think the guests should re-make the bed for 2 reasons: first, one cannot assume the hosts will have time to immediately do the laundry, second, it makes the room look neater.

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