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Crime And Punishment in America

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Hour 1: As politicians have vowed to get tough on crime, the nation’s penal system has grown exponentially. But research suggests that locking up more people has not served the social function intended. We’ll talk this hour about the problems with the criminal justice system with Natasha A. Frost, Associate Dean and Associate Professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Northeastern University. She’s the co-author of The Punishment Imperative: The Rise and Failure of Mass Incarceration in America.

http://podcastdownload.npr.org/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/77/510036/295365602/KERA_295365602.mp3]

  • Gabriel Adel

    Your program subject matter today was very fascinating and
    the issue your guest -Natasha A. Frost, spoke about was very much of an interest to me, since I was just
    contemplating working on the issue myself. As much as I agreed with all the
    point she made on the issue, I was as many times disagree with few of some of
    the point, Yes the disadvantage neighborhoods all across the country, no doubt
    have been the major contributor to the prison population and there is no doubt
    that the result of this can be seen in these neighborhoods as well. Since the
    poor and the minority are the people in this disadvantage neighborhood, hence accounted
    for the majority of the prison population across the country.

    For me, I don’t see the
    justice system to lock up people for whatever crime they have committed as the
    problem, since this is how the society agreed that a person that commits crime
    or offenders should be punished or made to pay for their crime or their
    offences by been put in jail or been locked up. So as long as there are crimes
    that people are committing as long as much we will continue to have the prison
    system with us and the majority of the people that will continue to fill up the
    jails and the prison will continue to be the minority and people from the impoverished
    community.

    In view of the above, if
    we want to solve the prison system problems, why doesn’t our attention be
    turned to the community why the majority of the prison population comes out
    from. The community that has become a
    pipeline or serving as a one that most of the people in the prison population
    came through. Our attention to dealing with the issue from the impoverish community
    level, will undoubtedly start dealing with the issues and the problems that
    tend to breed most of the people that commit crimes.

    Most of these people, that
    ended up in jail, they more or less have found themselves in a default mode, a
    mode that offer them less and less choice that they can made. When your choices
    are limited, you tend to make the only one available to you and that is the
    case with most of these people that have come from the community where the
    choice for them are limited if not none.

    I did agree with her that
    the structural problems and challenges are enormous to deal with as a place
    start with in dealing with the prison population and as challenging and difficult
    this is, so should be the focus, the energy and the capital that needed to be
    directed to dealing with the impoverish community. Ignoring this community and
    try to deal with the problem by changing
    the law and the or closing down the prison system, is not going to deterred
    people from committing crime and its not going to deal with the problem that
    people some people in the part that leads them to jail or to the prison..

  • Gabriel Adel

    Your program subject matter today was very fascinating and
    the issue your guest -Natasha A. Frost, spoke about was very much of an interest to me, since I was just
    contemplating working on the issue myself. As much as I agreed with all the
    point she made on the issue, I was as many times disagree with few of some of
    the point, Yes the disadvantage neighborhoods all across the country, no doubt
    have been the major contributor to the prison population and there is no doubt
    that the result of this can be seen in these neighborhoods as well. Since the
    poor and the minority are the people in this disadvantage neighborhood, hence accounted
    for the majority of the prison population across the country.

    For me, I don’t see the
    justice system to lock up people for whatever crime they have committed as the
    problem, since this is how the society agreed that a person that commits crime
    or offenders should be punished or made to pay for their crime or their
    offences by been put in jail or been locked up. So as long as there are crimes
    that people are committing as long as much we will continue to have the prison
    system with us and the majority of the people that will continue to fill up the
    jails and the prison will continue to be the minority and people from the impoverished
    community.

    In view of the above, if
    we want to solve the prison system problems, why doesn’t our attention be
    turned to the community why the majority of the prison population comes out
    from. The community that has become a
    pipeline or serving as a one that most of the people in the prison population
    came through. Our attention to dealing with the issue from the impoverish community
    level, will undoubtedly start dealing with the issues and the problems that
    tend to breed most of the people that commit crimes.

    Most of these people, that
    ended up in jail, they more or less have found themselves in a default mode, a
    mode that offer them less and less choice that they can made. When your choices
    are limited, you tend to make the only one available to you and that is the
    case with most of these people that have come from the community where the
    choice for them are limited if not none.

    I did agree with her that
    the structural problems and challenges are enormous to deal with as a place
    start with in dealing with the prison population and as challenging and difficult
    this is, so should be the focus, the energy and the capital that needed to be
    directed to dealing with the impoverish community. Ignoring this community and
    try to deal with the problem by changing
    the law and the or closing down the prison system, is not going to deterred
    people from committing crime and its not going to deal with the problem that
    people some people in the part that leads them to jail or to the prison..

  • Gabriel Adel

    Your program subject matter today was very fascinating and
    the issue your guest -Natasha A. Frost, spoke about was very much of an interest to me, since I was just
    contemplating working on the issue myself. As much as I agreed with all the
    point she made on the issue, I was as many times disagree with few of some of
    the point, Yes the disadvantage neighborhoods all across the country, no doubt
    have been the major contributor to the prison population and there is no doubt
    that the result of this can be seen in these neighborhoods as well. Since the
    poor and the minority are the people in this disadvantage neighborhood, hence accounted
    for the majority of the prison population across the country.

    For me, I don’t see the
    justice system to lock up people for whatever crime they have committed as the
    problem, since this is how the society agreed that a person that commits crime
    or offenders should be punished or made to pay for their crime or their
    offences by been put in jail or been locked up. So as long as there are crimes
    that people are committing as long as much we will continue to have the prison
    system with us and the majority of the people that will continue to fill up the
    jails and the prison will continue to be the minority and people from the impoverished
    community.

    In view of the above, if
    we want to solve the prison system problems, why doesn’t our attention be
    turned to the community why the majority of the prison population comes out
    from. The community that has become a
    pipeline or serving as a one that most of the people in the prison population
    came through. Our attention to dealing with the issue from the impoverish community
    level, will undoubtedly start dealing with the issues and the problems that
    tend to breed most of the people that commit crimes.

    Most of these people, that
    ended up in jail, they more or less have found themselves in a default mode, a
    mode that offer them less and less choice that they can made. When your choices
    are limited, you tend to make the only one available to you and that is the
    case with most of these people that have come from the community where the
    choice for them are limited if not none.

    I did agree with her that
    the structural problems and challenges are enormous to deal with as a place
    start with in dealing with the prison population and as challenging and difficult
    this is, so should be the focus, the energy and the capital that needed to be
    directed to dealing with the impoverish community. Ignoring this community and
    try to deal with the problem by changing
    the law and the or closing down the prison system, is not going to deterred
    people from committing crime and its not going to deal with the problem that
    people some people in the part that leads them to jail or to the prison..

  • Christopher_Graves

    According to economist Steven Levitt the higher number of incarcerations in the United States is a primary reason for the dramatic decline in the crime rate since the early 1990′s. Consider his article, “Understanding Why Crime Fell in the 1990′s: Four Factors that Explain the Decline and Six that Do Not,” *Journal of Economic Perspectives* Winter 2004, where he makes the point that incarceration lowered the crime rate due to “incapacitation” and deterrence. See especially pages 177-178.

    http://pricetheory.uchicago.edu/levitt/Papers/LevittUnderstandingWhyCrime2004.pdf

  • Anonymous

    According to economist Steven Levitt the higher number of incarcerations in the United States is a primary reason for the dramatic decline in the crime rate since the early 1990′s. Consider his article, “Understanding Why Crime Fell in the 1990′s: Four Factors that Explain the Decline and Six that Do Not,” *Journal of Economic Perspectives* Winter 2004, where he makes the point that incarceration lowered the crime rate due to “incapacitation” and deterrence. See especially pages 177-178.

    http://pricetheory.uchicago.edu/levitt/Papers/LevittUnderstandingWhyCrime2004.pdf

  • Anonymous

    According to economist Steven Levitt the higher number of incarcerations in the United States is a primary reason for the dramatic decline in the crime rate since the early 1990′s. Consider his article, “Understanding Why Crime Fell in the 1990′s: Four Factors that Explain the Decline and Six that Do Not,” *Journal of Economic Perspectives* Winter 2004, where he makes the point that incarceration lowered the crime rate due to “incapacitation” and deterrence. See especially pages 177-178.

    http://pricetheory.uchicago.edu/levitt/Papers/LevittUnderstandingWhyCrime2004.pdf

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