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Economic Gender Gap In Texas Remains

Think 5 Comments 224

In Texas, 30 percent of all households are run by women, yet they represent 53 percent of Texas households living in poverty. We’ll talk this hour about the economic challenges that Texas women face with Roslyn Dawson Thompson of Dallas Women’s Foundation and Frances P. Deviney of the Center for Public Policy Priorities. You can take a look at the new Economic Issues for Women in Texas report here.

  • James Alias

    Yes women make less than men. However besides women who end up with children through either divorce or rape, they are knowingly choosing to have children born in poverty in too many cases. If you know life is unfair and you don’t get paid the same as men, why have children when birth control, the morning after and abortion (limited but still available) is the best life choice.

    I can’t fix wages, and I can’t fix society being unfair. However, you have total control over your choices even if the number of choices to choose from are less than ideal. Sure a man born into a wealthy family and given a privileged education has almost unlimited choices, but that doesn’t mean you as a women don’t have any.

    Don’t get me wrong, I am not blaming the poor for being poor. I just felt frustrated listening to the people talk today on Think. I can’t fix the wage issue and I can’t fix poverty in Texas, we can’t afford universal preschool, free healthcare, subsidized housing, etc. for all the poor families in Texas and for all the single parents. But you have a choice to have children or not. That means both men and women. Babies just don’t happen. The morning after pill or what ever method used is easier and cheaper than raising children in poverty.

    • eperez

      “why have children when birth control, the morning after and abortion (limited but still available) is the best life choice.
      … However, you have total control over your choices even if the number of choices to choose from are less than ideal.
      … But you have a choice to have children or not.”

      so, which planet and society are you from? yes everyone has choices, but to simplify the problem down to women NOT choosing to avoid having children is patronizing, ignoring many many health/social/economic issues, and way out of touch w/ reality!

      • James Alias

        If your poor, it isn’t your choice. But to have children and burden everyone else and expect that they will provide them childcare, healthcare, free food, housing, free education and other benefits just because you decided to have children you can’t afford is the wrong choice. Then I am suppose to feel guilty for not providing your children with all of these things. I am not young, I was born into a poor rural family that didn’t get all of these government freebies and benefits as they weren’t available back then. Life wasn’t fair to me because I was poor, boohoo.

        Like I said I can’t fix the unfairness. I just hate all the people crying about women not having free or affordable child care and the like. Yes it is unfair, but don’t expect me to fix it. The only thing you can do is be responsible for yourself and your children, and sometimes the best choices in life is not to have children. Else expect that their life is going to be more difficult and your life is going to be a struggle as well. Don’t expect sympathy and don’t expect fairness and don’t expect freebies.

  • eperez

    so where can i find out info for helping out / volunteering in areas of education, financial education, etc?

  • Mel

    I agree with James in that one chooses whether or not to have children.
    To me, it makes sense not to have a child since I can just barely take
    care of my own needs (and some wants) with my income. Not that I don’t
    have plenty of love to give; I’m considering fostering a child one day.
    It seems to me that maybe more sex education and birth control
    education and mainstream discussion is needed to prevent some of these
    problems in the first place.

    Also, I was hoping to hear about
    single women at different stages of their lives on the program. It
    seemed like “women” was synonymous with “single-women-with-kids,” but
    not all of us are part of that tradition. However, we still face many
    of the same issues and probably some unique ones, too.

    Thank you, as always, for an interesting, thought-provoking Think program! I listen every day.

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