Kaku2

How Science Will Shape Human Destiny

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Hour 2: From the archives – How will the fields of medicine, computers, artificial intelligence, nanotechnology, energy production and astronautics change our lives in the not-too-distant future? We talked in April with Michio Kaku, professor of theoretical physics at the City University of New York and author of the new book “Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100″ (Doubleday, 2011).

  • James Murgolo

    I am a big fan of Michio Kaku.  Having said that, I disagree with his opening remarks.  The reason electronic media hasn’t taken off fully is largely a generational gap.  I and my children have no problem with electronic means of storage for personally significant memorabilia.  Regarding telecommuting, I think this is far more complicated than saying people like to see each other and bond.  I have worked all my life and bonding was never a reason for going to work.  I posit some of the reasons to be: immaturity of the technology (insufficient information about people/group resulting from missed social cues, etc. not transferred through current technology), generational gap, and supervision/accountability issues with work from home.  In 20 – 30 years I think telecommuting and teleconferencing will be far more prevalent.

  • James Murgolo

    I am a big fan of Michio Kaku.  Having said that, I disagree with his opening remarks.  The reason electronic media hasn’t taken off fully is largely a generational gap.  I and my children have no problem with electronic means of storage for personally significant memorabilia.  Regarding telecommuting, I think this is far more complicated than saying people like to see each other and bond.  I have worked all my life and bonding was never a reason for going to work.  I posit some of the reasons to be: immaturity of the technology (insufficient information about people/group resulting from missed social cues, etc. not transferred through current technology), generational gap, and supervision/accountability issues with work from home.  In 20 – 30 years I think telecommuting and teleconferencing will be far more prevalent.

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