museum-tower51

Museum Tower, The Nasher, and Future Development

Think 6 Comments 4

Hour 1:           How should development and design be managed in an urban environment that includes parks, museums, high-rise office towers and residential buildings? We’ll discuss the Museum Tower development and its effects on the Nasher Sculpture Center and the Dallas Arts District this hour with Tim Rogers, Editor of D Magazine, Sean Garman, Architect and Senior Associate at Perkins+Will, John Mullen, Architect and Co-Founder of The Container Store, and Jerome Weeks of KERA’s Art&Seek.

  • Gene in Dallas

    As a tenant of Chase Tower adjacent to the Museum Tower and DMA, I’ve watched this building grow literally from the ground up. There is no question this situation poses some issues for the DMA and Nasher, and is due to a failure of communication from the Museum Tower builders as well as a failure of the building department and city planners.

    BUT – the portrayal of the Museum Tower as a “Towering Inferno” is complete hyperbole designed to grab the attention of the public. They – the D Magazine article in particular – make is sound like anyone walking by the tower will burst into flames. They portray the building as concentrating “250% of the suns energy” on the poor Nasher. This is highly misleading and I believe inaccurate. The Museum Tower is convex in both planes, a design that disperses – not concentrates - the suns energy. A flat building would produce much higher temperatures due to overlapping reflections from adjacent panels of glass. The convex design prevents this overlap.

    I’ve spent a great deal of time in this area, and since the eruption of this controversy have paid specific attention to reflected sunlight. Are there times when there are bright reflections from Museum Tower? Sure. But they are neither as omnipresent or as intense as certain parties would have you believe, and in my opinion are not accurately portrayed by the media. Museum Tower reflects no more sunlight than many buildings in downtown Dallas. I feel the treatment by the media is not giving the public the information needed to make an informed decision on this matter.

    Again, there is no question steps must be taken to protect art at the DMA and the Nasher. Light is always an consideration re art preservation. However, Museum Tower is not the bad guy here. The story of neighbors being unhappy with nearby development goes back to the dawn of construction. The position that the onus is entirely on the Museum Tower – with estimated costs as high as $20 million dollars – is a best case for the DMA and Nasher, but completely ridiculous in my opinion. I’m sorry if you don’t like the view of the new neighbors yard, but adding curtains to your windows is a more reasonable solution than forcing them to build a privacy fence. 

    This brings to mind controversy over the World Trade Center circa 1970. People forget the twin towers were hated and opposed by many before, during, and after their construction. But over time they became the symbol of a great city. I believe the same will be true of Museum Tower. It is a beautiful and graceful building, taking on the color of the sky and blending into environment in a way few buildings I’ve seen do. 

    • Julia H.

      Very nicely, succinctly and fairly stated, Gene in Dallas. Agree 100%.

  • Pingback: Think Audio: Museum Tower, the Nasher and Future Development | Art&Seek | Arts, Music, Culture for North Texas

  • Julia H.

    Very nicely, succinctly and fairly stated, Gene in Dallas. Agree 100%.

  • Guest

     I’d sure like to point out how developers around Ft Worth
    Modern Museum are much more modest compare to Dallas cultural district.

    They are very considerate and appreciative of Museum being
    there and shifting economy into the cultural district.

    They sure did not want to do anything that would detract
    from one of the prime jewels of the city.

    ~ just saying!

  • Guest

     I’d sure like to point out how developers around Ft Worth
    Modern Museum are much more modest compare to Dallas cultural district.

    They are very considerate and appreciative of Museum being
    there and shifting economy into the cultural district.

    They sure did not want to do anything that would detract
    from one of the prime jewels of the city.

    ~ just saying!

Back to Top