Why Good People Can't Get Jobs

Why Good People Can't Get Jobs

Think 7 Comments 8

Hour 1:           If millions of Americans are unemployed, why do many companies claim to be unable to find qualified applicants for the positions they do have available? We’ll talk this hour with Peter Cappelli, the George W. Taylor Professor of Management at The Wharton School and Director of Wharton’s Center for Human Resources. Cappelli is the author of “Why Good People Can’t Get Jobs: The Skills Gap and What Companies Can Do About It” (Wharton Digital Press, 2012).

  • Joann

    Some
    is really, really wrong when qualified people can’t get a job after find
    several good positions. I don’t know why the CEOs or whoever is over Human Resources
    not looking into this matter. Software CANNOT look an applicant in the face or into their eyes, only human beings havethat
    ability.

  • Joann

    Some
    is really, really wrong when qualified people can’t get a job after find
    several good positions. I don’t know why the CEOs or whoever is over Human Resources
    not looking into this matter. Software CANNOT look an applicant in the face or into their eyes, only human beings havethat
    ability.

  • Erika Nieman

    I only heard a small portion of this discussion, but as a job seeker, I am especially frustrated by the claim that companies can’t find someone qualified for their jobs. I consider myself to be a very savvy, responsible and hard-working 24 year old with high-quality college degrees, but I can’t seem to catch a break to get the “experience” deemed necessary to start with a company. I am trying to add to my skill set while working a full-time retail job. What else should a good, smart young person do to get a break? If I can’t get through a computer screening, how can I hope to shake someone’s hand?  

  • Erika Nieman

    I only heard a small portion of this discussion, but as a job seeker, I am especially frustrated by the claim that companies can’t find someone qualified for their jobs. I consider myself to be a very savvy, responsible and hard-working 24 year old with high-quality college degrees, but I can’t seem to catch a break to get the “experience” deemed necessary to start with a company. I am trying to add to my skill set while working a full-time retail job. What else should a good, smart young person do to get a break? If I can’t get through a computer screening, how can I hope to shake someone’s hand?  

    • Sam Walker

      Make sure your resume or application is tailored to the stated job requirements.  You may need to get “creative” to do this well.  One technique is a list of the required skills and then a statement describing how you meet that requirement.  Example:  The job wants someone with skill writing excel macros.

      You would address that as follows:

      ———————————————
      Relevant skills and experience:
      ———————————————

      Skill writing excel macros:
      I wrote several macros in my data management class at Gigantic State University.  In my job as a data entry clerk at XYZ company, I wrote a macro to automate the data entry process.

      In other words, you echo what is required in your resume.  This helps ensure that the computer will find you to be a good match.  It’s looking for the keywords.

  • Erika Nieman

    I only heard a small portion of this discussion, but as a job seeker, I am especially frustrated by the claim that companies can’t find someone qualified for their jobs. I consider myself to be a very savvy, responsible and hard-working 24 year old with high-quality college degrees, but I can’t seem to catch a break to get the “experience” deemed necessary to start with a company. I am trying to add to my skill set while working a full-time retail job. What else should a good, smart young person do to get a break? If I can’t get through a computer screening, how can I hope to shake someone’s hand?  

    • Sam Walker

      Make sure your resume or application is tailored to the stated job requirements.  You may need to get “creative” to do this well.  One technique is a list of the required skills and then a statement describing how you meet that requirement.  Example:  The job wants someone with skill writing excel macros.

      You would address that as follows:

      ———————————————
      Relevant skills and experience:
      ———————————————

      Skill writing excel macros:
      I wrote several macros in my data management class at Gigantic State University.  In my job as a data entry clerk at XYZ company, I wrote a macro to automate the data entry process.

      In other words, you echo what is required in your resume.  This helps ensure that the computer will find you to be a good match.  It’s looking for the keywords.

Back to Top