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Inside Israeli Politics

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Hour 1:           What are the obstacles that keep Israel from integrating with its Arab neighbors? We’ll explore the current state of Israeli politics this hour with Max Blumenthal. His new book is Goliath: Life and Loathing in Greater Israel (Nation Books). Blumenthal speaks tonight at an event sponsored by the World Affairs Council of Dallas/Fort Worth.

http://podcastdownload.npr.org/anon.npr-podcasts/podcast/77/510036/244583884/KERA_244583884.mp3?_kip_ipx=980768550-1384277235]

  • David Evans

    good day -

    I understand that the author has used the allusion to the story of David and Goliath as a spring board to dive into reality that is modern Israel – a very complicated thing. Has the author thought of considering the comparison to the story of the Golem (no direct relation to Tolkein’s Gollum* of the Lord of the Ring or the Hobbit)? The story in which a formless mass is brought to life with the Hebrew word ‘Emet’ meaning “truth” to help protect the Jewish people during a time of dire need when they were threatened. Only in some versions of the story, the wise Rabbi who raised the Golum, understands when it was time to rein in the Golum. The Israeli state can very well be seen in some ways in the roll of the Golum, but we are waiting for the wise Rabbi to call in and restrain the relentless power that the Golum unleashes on the Jews enemies … Maybe it’s a matter of determining when exactly will the Jews feel safe enough to put the Golum away.

    (grew up in Israel during the Yom Kippur war of ’73)

    *it’s possible that Tolkien worked in a play on the word (something he was fond of, being a linguist at his core) Golum in that the Hebrew word refers to a formless mass related to life, but without a soul or the spark of life. Gollum in the Lord of the Rings and the Hobbit was a creature like a Hobbit once, but devolved into the nearly formless creature he became when the ring stole his soul and self over its long association with him. In that way, there may be a connection to the Golum of the Jewish folklore story. Which may then bring the connection back to Israel (unintentionally) in the idea that the Golum was nothing without the spark of life, or the soul, or the wisdom to use the power …

  • David Evans

    good day -

    I understand that the author has used the allusion to the story of David and Goliath as a spring board to dive into reality that is modern Israel – a very complicated thing. Has the author thought of considering the comparison to the story of the Golem (no direct relation to Tolkein’s Gollum* of the Lord of the Ring or the Hobbit)? The story in which a formless mass is brought to life with the Hebrew word ‘Emet’ meaning “truth” to help protect the Jewish people during a time of dire need when they were threatened. Only in some versions of the story, the wise Rabbi who raised the Golum, understands when it was time to rein in the Golum. The Israeli state can very well be seen in some ways in the roll of the Golum, but we are waiting for the wise Rabbi to call in and restrain the relentless power that the Golum unleashes on the Jews enemies … Maybe it’s a matter of determining when exactly will the Jews feel safe enough to put the Golum away.

    (grew up in Israel during the Yom Kippur war of ’73)

    *it’s possible that Tolkien worked in a play on the word (something he was fond of, being a linguist at his core) Golum in that the Hebrew word refers to a formless mass related to life, but without a soul or the spark of life. Gollum in the Lord of the Rings and the Hobbit was a creature like a Hobbit once, but devolved into the nearly formless creature he became when the ring stole his soul and self over its long association with him. In that way, there may be a connection to the Golum of the Jewish folklore story. Which may then bring the connection back to Israel (unintentionally) in the idea that the Golum was nothing without the spark of life, or the soul, or the wisdom to use the power …

  • Tom Jones

    Mr. Blumenthal needs to back up his story at least to the 1880′s and the beginnings of the Zionist immigration into Ottoman Palestine. The Palestinians have always protested at the idea of Jewish immigration. They did then and they do now. Is it going to work out well? It’s hard to see how.

  • Tom Jones

    Mr. Blumenthal needs to back up his story at least to the 1880′s and the beginnings of the Zionist immigration into Ottoman Palestine. The Palestinians have always protested at the idea of Jewish immigration. They did then and they do now. Is it going to work out well? It’s hard to see how.

  • Alan G

    Thank you Ms. Boyd for this opprtunity to hear Max Blumenthal views

  • Alan G

    Thank you Ms. Boyd for this opprtunity to hear Max Blumenthal views

  • Ashar

    This was really informative. Happy that KERA covered this and did not have biased broadcast like other stations.

  • Ashar

    This was really informative. Happy that KERA covered this and did not have biased broadcast like other stations.

  • Ashar

    This was really informative. Happy that KERA covered this and did not have biased broadcast like other stations.

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